Giraffes

Have you noticed an increase in giraffe books lately?  I’ll mention three that I’ve added to my collection.

If you go to Kohl’s this month, you may notice a stuffed giraffe and it’s coordinating book by Jory John and Lane Smith called Giraffe Problems. It is one of those wonderful stories of new friendship and the awareness that comes from understanding another’s perspective – along with a dose of learning to love our own physical appearances.  Yes, the world needed another book with that message.  We clearly have not yet learned it.  Theodore Roosevelt’s statement still rings true – “Comparison is the thief of joy.”

Another giraffe book that delights the K-2 set, is I am NOT a Chair by Ross Burach.  It is so fun to read out loud!  And it uses many of the writing techniques students are currently being taught at that age, such as pop out words and ellipses. Perfectly placed page turns build dramatic emphasis and the ending includes irony.  It truly is a joy for all ages – including difficult to please teenagers. 

A local book I wanted to mention is by Joan Schoettler.  It is called “A Home for George” and features a fictional story about how Valley Children’s found their giraffe mascot. It is a cute and much needed awareness tool for the hospital. I find myself wanting to stop by the gift shop to purchase my own stuffed George the giraffe; however, George isn’t the heart of that hospital – the people are.  

The children who frequent Valley Children’s, and the adults who dedicate their lives to it, deserve this book to be a first step.  There is so much more than should be said about this beautiful castle on the hill.  

I love that A Home for George was written and is being distributed – children in this valley benefit from the book’s existence. Mykel Newton Suntrapak’s illustrations beautifully depict scenes from this region and from the hospital. 

Every library in the Valley would benefit from having this book – even if it is simply to facilitate conversation.  Watching the faces of those who recognize this illustration speaks volumes. Listening to their stories brings hope.

Published by lovingthelibrary

I am an elementary school librarian who loves books and the kids who read them.

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